The mistakes could be predicted

An error dizzy during performance of a monotonous task may seem totally unpredictable, but its origins actually date back more deeply into the inner workings of our brain.In a study published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers used magnetic resonance imagery to save the configuration before the neurological mistakes.The recordings showed a cascade of changes in intensity of the activity of the brain linked to attention. Researchers have shown that these changes in speed in the minds of subjects performing a task can be automatically recorded 30 seconds before the error is actually committed, while the subjects themselves were not aware.If the same mechanisms occur in significant errors (such as falling asleep on the assembly line, or behind a steering wheel) then this discovery could be used to develop warning systems that could detect errors before they are committed.
“People could be made aware that they are not in better condition to work. “People could be made aware that they are not in better condition to work. Or people could learn to identify when is that their brain can be faulty,” says co-author Tom Eichele, a researcher in neurology of the University of Bergen in Norway.
During the experience Eichele, thirteen volunteers were subjected to repetitive game while their brain was observed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).They had to distinguish the direction of arrows on the thumbnails 400 times. About 30 seconds before the subjects of the experiment make a mistake in interpretation, the decreased blood flow in the posterior part of their frontal cortex, a brain region linked to the effort and concentration.
At the same time, activity has increased in the region of the brain that controls the monotonous tasks. Situated between the precuneus, the retrosplenial cortex and the medial frontal cortex earlier. Situated between the precuneus, the retrosplenial cortex and the medial frontal cortex earlier. This area controls the “automatic mode” tends to be in greater activity when performing a routine task or sleep.
In short, the conscious brain slows while the ships to prevent fails.
For now, the machines to achieve an MRI is not portable, but electroencephalographs (EEG) in the form of headsets already exist.The next step can the application of such a discovery will therefore Tom Eichele of discovering whether it is possible to detect these changes in activity this time by measuring the electrical activity of the brain using electrodes placed on scalp.