IR Proximity Detector Sensor

IR Proximity Detector SensorThis is the “no contact” obstacle detection system. The range is adjustable from 4″ to 26″. It is assembled using surface mount technology. Plug and Play with the Mini Atom Bot Board microcontroller.
Features
The IRPD has been improved! The IRPD is now assembled using surface mount technology. It includes wires and plugs to provide true plug and play use. The LEDs are now narrow beam 10 degree units. The IR detector is now a Panasonic PNA4602M. There is status LEDs to provide visual feedback to aid in setup. There is now a frequency pot and an LED drive pot.

Specifications
* Sensor type = Reflective IR
* IR detector = Panasonic PNA4602M
* IR LED type = Narrow focus 10ยบ
* I/O required = Three digital lines, 2 outputs, 1 input
* Minimum range = approximately 4″
* Maximum range = approximately 26″
* Input voltage = 5vdc regulated
* Current requirements = 8mA
* PC board size = 2.3″ x .75″

Information
When you have perfected the use of snap switches as whiskers on your small mobile robot, then it’s time to move up to a no contact method of obstacle detection. The Lynx motion IRPD coupled with a microcontroller is the next step in obstacle detection and avoidance. We even have sample programs for the Mini Atom Bot Board processor for all types of rolling and walking platforms. The IRPD can reliably detect obstacles in three separate quadrants, and the range is adjustable down to only a few inches. This is the least expensive best performing reflective IR sensor available, and it makes a very entertaining addition to any small mobile robot.

The IRPD uses a Panasonic PNA4602M IR sensor coupled with two IR LEDs to detect obstacles. The Panasonic module contains integrated amplifiers, filters, and a limiter. The detector responds to a modulated carrier to help eliminate background noise associated with sunlight and certain lighting fixtures. The LEDs are modulated by an adjustable free running oscillator. The sensitivity of the sensor is controlled by altering the drive current to the LEDs. The microcontroller alternately enables the LEDs and checks for a reflection. An obstacle can be detected on the left, the right or the center (both). Now the micro has enough information to guide the behavior of the robot. The current draw is low, around 8mA, which is mostly due to the fact that the IR LEDs are not on full time. Three digital I/O lines are needed from the host microcontroller. Room will be needed at the front of the robot to mount the sensor.

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